Virtual Meeting

Transforming International Affairs Education to Address Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

Wednesday, May 26, 2021
Enrique Calvo/Reuters
Speakers
Miguel Centeno

Vice Dean, Princeton School of Public and International Affairs; Professor of Sociology and International Affairs, Princeton University

Carla Koppell

Senior Advisor, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion and Distinguished Fellow, Institute for Women, Peace, and Security, Georgetown University

Presider
Jamille Bigio

Senior Fellow for Women and Foreign Policy, Council on Foreign Relations

Roundtable Series on New Security Strategies

Growing inequality and exclusion around the world are resulting in destabilization, creating security risks, and damaging U.S. interests. Across the United States, polarizing discourse, deepening inequalities, and disparate treatment of different subpopulations create vulnerabilities, reduce U.S. influence, and limit U.S. foreign policy’s effectiveness. International affairs schools help shape the next generation of national security leaders, but they risk contributing to America’s continued vulnerability by failing to address the security implications of diversity, equity, and inclusion. Please join our speakers, Miguel Centeno of Princeton University and Carla Koppell of Georgetown University, to discuss transforming international affairs education to address diversity, equity, and inclusion.
 

Additional reading: Carla Koppell, Reuben E. Brigety II, and Jamille Bigio, “Transforming International Affairs Education to Address Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion,” CFR.org.

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