Meeting

Virtual Roundtable: Growing Risk of a Military Confrontation in the South China Sea

Wednesday, June 3, 2020
STR/AFP via Getty Images
Speakers
Abraham M. Denmark

Director, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

Oriana Skylar Mastro

Assistant Professor of Security Studies, Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, and Resident Scholar, American Enterprise Institute

Presider

General John W. Vessey Senior Fellow for Conflict Prevention and Director of the Center for Preventive Action, Council on Foreign Relations

Center for Preventive Action Contingency Planning Roundtable, Center for Preventive Action, and Contingency Planning for Future Crises

As tensions rise between the United States and China, the risk of a military confrontation in the South China Sea between China and the United States is growing. Domestic politics in China, fallout from the ongoing U.S.-China trade war, and accusations over the spread of the novel coronavirus are adding to this risk. Please join our speakers, Oriana Skylar Mastro from Georgetown University and the American Enterprise Institute, and Abraham Denmark from the Wilson Center, to discuss a recent Contingency Planning Memorandum on the possibility of a U.S.-China military confrontation in the South China Sea and what U.S. policymakers can do to prevent it.

This meeting is made possible by the generous support of the Rockefeller Brothers Fund.

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