Meeting

Virtual Roundtable: Judging China: Illiberal Legal Systems in U.S. Courts

Thursday, January 13, 2022
Teh Eng Koon/Getty Images
Speakers
Donald Clarke

Professor of Law, George Washington University Law School

Mark Jia

Fellow, East Asian Legal Studies Program, Harvard Law School

Presider

Adjunct Senior Fellow for Asia, Council on Foreign Relations; Founder and Faculty Director Emeritus, U.S.-Asia Law Institute, New York University School of Law

The years following the Cold War have not seen a disappearance of illiberal regimes, but they have seen a vast growth in globalization and transnational commercial relations. Thus, U.S. courts are faced far more than before with the need to understand and deal with fundamentally different legal systems—for example, when asked to enforce a judgment from an illiberal system. How are they doing? Speakers Donald Clarke and Mark Jia discuss both the challenges posed by illiberal legal orders and the specific problems faced by U.S. courts dealing with the Chinese legal system.

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