Bernard Gwertzman, Former New York Times Editor, Writer, Joins Council’s Web Staff

October 24, 2002

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October 24, 2002 - Bernard Gwertzman, a long-time New York Times correspondent and editor, has joined the Council on Foreign Relations’ website staff as consulting editor. Gwertzman, whose last job for the Times was as editor-in-chief of nytimes.com (1995-2002), served in Moscow as bureau chief, in Washington as diplomatic correspondent, in New York as deputy foreign editor, and as foreign editor, where he supervised the Times’s coverage of the fall of Communism in Europe, the break up of the Soviet Union, and the Persian Gulf war.

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Gwertzman will work with Irina Faskianos, Vice President for National and Outreach Programs, and Lisa Shields, Director of Communications, to advance the Council’s outreach mission—making the Council the source for ideas and information on key international issues for the interested public. “Bernie brings world-class experience, judgment and skill to our outreach mission in general and to our website in particular,” said Council President Leslie H. Gelb.

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Gwertzman, a Council member since 1982 and a native New Yorker, graduated from Harvard College in 1957, and in 1960 received a master’s degree in Soviet affairs from Harvard’s Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. After service in the army, he joined the Washington Evening Star before joining the Times in 1968.


Contact: Lisa Shields, Director of Communications, 212-434-9888

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