Council Terrorism Website Nominated for Online Journalism Award

September 23, 2002
12:20 pm (EST)

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Nation’s First Online Encyclopedia of Terrorism Recognized for its Unique Contribution to the Public’s Understanding of the War on Terrorism and America’s Response


NEW YORK, September 20, 2002 – The Council’s “Terrorism: Questions & Answers” website is one of three finalists for an Online Journalism Award (OJA) for independent service journalism, given by the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism and the Online News Association. The Council’s main website, www.cfr.org, was also honored this year with a nomination for a Webby Award for online excellence, given by the International Academy of Digital Arts & Sciences.

Council President Leslie H. Gelb conceptualized the online encyclopedia of terrorism and worked closely with Senior Fellow Warren Bass, who edited the site and directed the research and writing team, Communications Director Lisa Shields, and Executive Vice President Michael P. Peters.

“This nomination has given our terrorism site the recognition that it deserves. It has become an integral part of the Council’s main website and the pivot of our new outreach mission—to provide the interested public with solid information and ideas on key international issues,” said Gelb.

“Terrorism: Questions & Answers” is produced in cooperation with the Markle Foundation. The winners of the Online Journalism Awards will be announced during the OJA Conference in New York City on Friday, Oct. 18, 2002.

For more information go to http://www.onlinejournalismawards.org/pr2002finalists3.html.


Contact: Lisa Shields, Director of Communications, 212-434-9888

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