Daniel Senor Joins Council’s Mideast Studies Program

June 4, 2008

News Releases

More on:

CFR News

Middle East and North Africa

Daniel Senor, an expert on Iraq, Israeli-Palestinian relations, and Middle East and Persian Gulf geopolitics, security, and economics, has joined the Council as adjunct senior fellow for Middle East studies. He is currently working on a book about the Israeli economy and globalization. From 2003 to 2004, Senor served in the administration of George W. Bush, as a Pentagon and White House adviser based in Doha, Qatar,
at U.S. Central Command Forward, and later based in Kuwait and Iraq, where he worked for both the Office of Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance and the Coalition Provisional Authority. He was chief spokesman and senior adviser for the coalition. One of the longest-serving civilians in Iraq, Senor was awarded the Department of Defense Distinguished Civilian Service Award. Previously, Senor was a foreign policy and communications adviser in the U.S. Senate. Senor is an analyst for Fox News and a founding partner of Rosemont Capital. He writes frequently for the Wall Street Journal and has also authored pieces for the New York Times, Washington Post, New York Post, and Weekly Standard. Senor received a BA from the University of Western Ontario and an MBA from Harvard Business School, and studied at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

More on:

CFR News

Middle East and North Africa

Up
Close

Explore More on CFR

Food and Water Security

A historic dry spell has severely affected Cape Town's water supply, and global climate patterns suggest that other cities may face the same fate.

Southeast Asia

The U.S.-Indonesia relationship has often disappointed. It’s time to rethink U.S.-Indonesia ties and try to achieve real security goals, rather than make bold plans for cooperation that never come to fruition.

European Union

European leaders are rushing to implement new laws to curb disinformation on social media. However, existing European data protection laws might actually make it harder for bad actors to spread fake news online.