Michael J. Gerson, Former Top Bush Aide, Joins Council

Gerson, who joined the Council as senior fellow on July 31, will author a book on the future of conservatism, and speak and write on issues such as global health and development, religion and foreign policy, and the democracy agenda.

July 31, 2006

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Michael J. Gerson, President George W. Bush’s long-time speechwriter and adviser, will join the Council on Foreign Relations as a senior fellow on July 31. He will author a book on the future of conservatism, and speak and write on issues such as global health and development, religion and foreign policy, and the democracy agenda.

“I am thrilled to welcome Mike to the Council,” said President Richard N. Haass. “It is not just that he is one of the country’s great writers, which he most certainly is. It is also that he is one of this country’s most important thinkers—someone in a position to have a significant impact on the debate about this country’s purpose in the world.”

Gerson was named assistant to the president for policy and strategic planning by President Bush in February 2005. Previously, he had served as assistant to the president for speechwriting and policy adviser since July 2002. He served as deputy assistant to the president and director of presidential speechwriting from January 2001 to July 2002.

Prior to joining the administration, Gerson was chief speechwriter and senior policy adviser for the Bush for President Campaign. Earlier in his career, he was the senior editor covering politics at U.S. News & World Report. He was also the speechwriter and policy adviser for Congressman Jack Kemp, speechwriter for Senator Bob Dole during the 1996 presidential campaign, and policy director for Senator Dan Coats.

Gerson received his bachelor’s degree from Wheaton College in Illinois.

Contact: Lisa Shields, Communications: 212-434-9888; lshields@cfr.org

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