New Fellow Robert Shapiro to Focus on Domestic Perceptions of Foreign Policy

New Fellow Robert Shapiro to Focus on Domestic Perceptions of Foreign Policy

January 26, 2005 3:13 pm (EST)

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Robert Y. Shapiro, a renowned specialist in American politics and public opinion, has joined the Council as a visiting fellow to research American attitudes toward foreign policy and the social and political attitudes of soldiers and officers in the U.S. Army.

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Currently a professor at Columbia University and a former chair of the department of political science there, Shapiro is the coauthor of the award-winning books, The Rational Public: Fifty Years of Trends in Americans’ Policy Preferences (with Benjamin I. Page, University of Chicago Press, 1992), and Politicians Don’t Pander: Political Manipulation and the Loss of Democratic Responsiveness (with Lawrence R. Jacobs, University of Chicago Press, 2000).

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Co-author or co-editor of several other books, he has published numerous articles in major academic journals and serves on the editorial board of Public Opinion Quarterly (editor of the ‘Poll Trends’), Political Science Quarterly, and Presidential Studies Quarterly. He is also a member of the board of directors of the Roper Center for Public Opinion Research.

Shapiro was an expert witness for the U.S. Department of Justice in its successful defense in the federal courts of the most recent campaign finance reform law. His research has continued to examine presidential policy-making, leadership, and trends in public opinion on domestic and foreign policy issues from 1960 to the present. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago.

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