New Senior Fellow Ronald D. Asmus to Examine U.S. Relationship with NATO and Europe after Cold War

January 7, 2003

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December 13, 1999, New York, NY - Ronald D. Asmus, one of the nation’s leading experts on European security, will join the Council on Foreign Relations as a Senior Fellow for European Studies in early 2000, announced Council President Leslie H. Gelb. Drawing on his recent experience as Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for European Affairs, Dr. Asmus will lead a study group that analyzes the debate over the role of Europe and NATO in American foreign policy since the end of the Cold War, which will result in a book. His work will tie together security questions with underlying political and economic trends.

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Since 1997, Dr. Asmus has served as Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for European Affairs, where he was responsible for the formulation and implementation of U.S. policy on all European security institutions. Before this post, he was a senior analyst at RAND from 1988 to 1997, where he conducted research on a wide variety of European security issues. He has specialized in NATO and was one of the leaders in the move to expand the alliance eastward. At the Council he will be looking into European security matters in a broad political and economic context.

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Dr. Asmus received his Ph.D. and M.A. from Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies, and his B.A. from the University of Wisconsin.

Dr. Asmus will be based in the Council’s Washington, D.C., office.

The Council on Foreign Relations, founded in 1921 and based in New York, is a national nonpartisan membership organization and think tank dedicated to fostering America’s understanding of other nations through study and debate.

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Security Alliances

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