Princeton N. Lyman Named First Holder of Ralph Bunche Africa Policy Studies Chair at the Council on Foreign Relations

January 17, 2003

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New York, January 14, 2003 – Former Ambassador Princeton N. Lyman will be the first holder of the Ralph Bunche endowed chair in Africa Policy Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, Council President Leslie H. Gelb announced today. “Ambassador Lyman is simply unique in his experience, knowledge and contacts regarding Africa. His activities at the Council will provide a central energizing point for mobilizing talent to work with African leaders on concrete solutions to specific problems," said Gelb.

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Ambassador Lyman is currently Executive Director of the Global Interdependence Initiative of the Aspen Institute. He served for over three decades in the U.S. Department of State and U.S. Agency for International Development, completing his government service as Assistant Secretary of State for International Organization Affairs. He was previously U.S. Ambassador to South Africa, Ambassador to Nigeria, and director of the U.S. Aid Mission to Ethiopia at USAID. His honors include the President’s Distinguished Service Award and the Department of State Distinguished Honor Award.

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The Council established the Ralph Bunche Chair in Africa Policy Studies in the belief that solving matters of economic and political development in Africa along with its vast health and humanitarian calamities will help advance United States national security interests as well.

Lyman will take up his position at the Council on February 1. He will also remain Executive Director of the Global Interdependence Initiative of the Aspen Institute until July.


Contact: Lisa Shields, Director of Communications, 212-434-9888

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