Episode 3: The Divide Between Japan and South Korea

Professor Yoshihide Soeya describes how Japanese society has grappled with this complex bilateral relationship and how the new Korean administration might change the equation for Japan. 

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Episode Guests
  • Sheila A. Smith
    John E. Merow Senior Fellow for Asia-Pacific Studies
  • Yoshihide Soeya

Show Notes

Japan’s relationship with South Korea has long been complicated by historical grievances. Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has pursued reconciliation, but much work remains to be done. Professor Yoshihide Soeya describes how Japanese society has grappled with this complex bilateral relationship and how the new Korean administration might change the equation for Japan and the United States.

 

This podcast series is part of a project on Northeast Asian Nationalisms and the U.S.-Japan Alliance, which is made possible through support from the U.S.-Japan Foundation.

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