Episode 7: New Voices in the Struggle Over History

Professor Celeste Arrington looks at the recent rise of activist citizen movements in Japan and South Korea and how they have changed the conversation over war memory in both countries.

Play Button Pause Button
0:00 0:00
x
Episode Guests
  • Sheila A. Smith
    John E. Merow Senior Fellow for Asia-Pacific Studies
  • Celeste Arrington
    Korea Foundation Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, George Washington University

Show Notes

The legacies of colonialism and war have long plagued Japan’s relations with South Korea, yet the politics of these issues are never static. Professor Celeste Arrington looks at the recent rise of activist citizen movements in Japan and South Korea and how they have changed the conversation over war memory in both countries.

 

This podcast series is part of a project on Northeast Asian Nationalisms and the U.S.-Japan Alliance, which is made possible through support from the U.S.-Japan Foundation.

Japan

The United States has become more inward-focused and nationalistic, but as Toshihiro Nakayama argues, Japan does not have a back-up plan to its alliance with the United States.

United States

Toshihiro Nakayama evaluates today’s politics in the United States and argues that the fundamental shift that has taken place under President Donald Trump is not likely to end with his presidency.

China

Jessica Chen Weiss discusses the nature of activism in China and how the Chinese government is responding to these new challenges.

Top Stories on CFR

 

NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization)

The war in Ukraine marks a new era of instability in Europe. Countering Russia’s efforts will require a stronger, more coordinated NATO.

China

After the rise of Chinese power during the 2010s and failed U.S. policies in the Indo-Pacific, the United States should renew the Pivot to Asia and place the region at the center of its grand strategy.*