A Nuclear-Armed Iran

Possible Security and Diplomatic Implications

June 02, 2010

Report

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Iran

Nonproliferation, Arms Control, and Disarmament

Overview

How would an Iranian acquisition of a nuclear weapons capability affect U.S. policy in the Middle East? In this discussion paper, sponsored by the Carnegie Corporation of New York, Mitchell B. Reiss enumerates several strategic choices that would face U.S. regional allies and the adverse implications for U.S. interests.

Mitchell B. Reiss

President, Washington College, and Former Director of the Office of Policy Planning, U.S. State Department

Note: Contributors were not asked their views about the possibility that Iran may develop nuclear weapons nor about the most effective U.S. policies to avoid that eventuality. Rather, they were told to assume that despite U.S. efforts, Iran had developed nuclear weapons, and they were asked to help assess U.S. options at that point.

More on:

Iran

Nonproliferation, Arms Control, and Disarmament

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