A Nuclear-Armed Iran

Possible Security and Diplomatic Implications

June 02, 2010

Report

More on:

Iran

Nonproliferation, Arms Control, and Disarmament

Overview

How would an Iranian acquisition of a nuclear weapons capability affect U.S. policy in the Middle East? In this discussion paper, sponsored by the Carnegie Corporation of New York, Mitchell B. Reiss enumerates several strategic choices that would face U.S. regional allies and the adverse implications for U.S. interests.

Mitchell B. Reiss

President, Washington College, and Former Director of the Office of Policy Planning, U.S. State Department

Note: Contributors were not asked their views about the possibility that Iran may develop nuclear weapons nor about the most effective U.S. policies to avoid that eventuality. Rather, they were told to assume that despite U.S. efforts, Iran had developed nuclear weapons, and they were asked to help assess U.S. options at that point.

More on:

Iran

Nonproliferation, Arms Control, and Disarmament

Top Stories on CFR

Iran

Neither Iran nor the United States likely wants war, but the possibility of a miscommunication is considerable, risking a dangerous escalation.

European Union

Populist parties are looking to make big gains in European Parliament elections. That could disrupt EU policy on issues from trade to migration.

Trade

Tariffs have been applied over the years to protect homegrown industries and target competitors who are seen as using unfair trade practices. They impose costs on both importers and exporters and had been in decline until the recent U.S.-China trade spat.