SAVE Supporting Document: Leaving the Gang

Logging Off and Moving On

November 28, 2011

Report

Overview

Why do people leave a group that they have been a member of? What do they do to leave their group? What role, if any, do the use of social media and the Internet play in this process? These questions and more are addressed in this paper, which is a follow-on to the Summit Against Violent Extremism (SAVE) held by Google Ideas and CFR in Dublin in June 2011.

David C. Pyrooz

Doctoral Candidate, School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Arizona State University

Scott H. Decker

Foundation Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Arizona State University

This paper was commissioned by Google Ideas. The content and opinions expressed in the paper are the authors' own.

More on:

Radicalization and Extremism

Terrorism and Counterterrorism

United States

The Council on Foreign Relations takes no institutional positions on policy issues and has no affiliation with the U.S. government. All views expressed in its publications and on its website are the sole responsibility of the author or authors.

More on:

Radicalization and Extremism

Terrorism and Counterterrorism

United States

Top Stories on CFR

China

As China’s power continues to grow, some fear that the considerable autonomy Hong Kong has enjoyed over the last three decades could slip away.

Conflict Prevention

The trade war, fallout from COVID-19, and increased military activity raise the risk of conflict between the United States and China in the South China Sea. Oriana Skylar Mastro offers nine recommendations for ways the United States can prevent or mitigate a military clash. 

China

China is undertaking massive infrastructure projects across the world and loaning billions of dollars to developing nations. On paper, the objective is to build a vast trade network, but is China also exporting authoritarianism?