Success or Sellout

The U.S.-North Korean Nuclear Accord

January 07, 1995

Task Force Report
Analysis and policy prescriptions of major foreign policy issues facing the United States, developed through private deliberations among a diverse and distinguished group of experts.

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Americas

Nonproliferation, Arms Control, and Disarmament

North Korea

The U.S.-North Korean Agreed Framework of October 1994 holds the potential for resolving the Nuclear proliferation threat from the North, promoting stability on the Korean Peninsula, and furthering North-South dialogue. Yet it also could exacerbate tensions on the peninsula and introduce new problems into U.S. ties with both South Korea and Japan. The key now lies in Washington, Seoul, and Tokyo; how they manage the pact's implementation will determine—even more than its terms—whether the accords leads to good or ill.

This report—the result of an expert bipartisan task force—traces the history of the negotiations, explains what the accord contains, what it requires from the parties, and provides responses to commonly raised questions and criticisms. It also suggests some guidelines for the United States, South Korea, and Japan as they implement the agreement—or protect themselves against its failure.

More on:

Americas

Nonproliferation, Arms Control, and Disarmament

North Korea

Up

Task Force Members Up

Kenneth L. Adelman

Byung-Joon Ahn

Chang-Yoon Choi

Yoichi Funabashi

Leslie H. Gelb

William Gleysteen, Jr.

Donald P. Gregg

Richard N. Haass

Hong-Choo Hyun

Arnold Kanter

Kyung Won Kim

Dong-Bok Lee

Jessica Tuchman Mathews

Don Oberdorfer

Douglas H. Paul

Nicholas Platt

Sang-Woo Rhee

Robert W. RisCassi

William Y. Smith

Stephen J. Solarz

Richard H. Solomon

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