from Africa in Transition

Nigeria Security Tracker Weekly Update: June 17 - June 23

June 26, 2017

Tracker

Below is a visualization and description of some of the most significant incidents of political violence in Nigeria from June 17 to June 23, 2017. This update also represents violence related to Boko Haram in Cameroon, Chad, and Niger. These incidents will be included in the Nigeria Security Tracker.

 

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  • June 17: Boko Haram killed "scores" (est. at forty) in Damboa, Borno.
  • June 18: Five suicide bombers killed themselves and twelve others in Maiduguri, Borno.
  • June 18: Sectarian violence led to three deaths in Sardauna, Taraba.
  • June 18: Sectarian violence led to two deaths in Lafia, Nasarawa.
  • June 20: Boko Haram killed one policemen and two others, and kidnapped sixteen in Damboa, Borno.
  • June 20: A Boko Haram landmine killed three in Konduga, Borno.
  • June 20: Sectarian violence led to two deaths in Ndokwa West and one in Ndokwa East in Delta.
  • June 21: Boko Haram killed six in Kolofata, Cameroon.
  • June 21: Sectarian violence led to eight deaths in Akamkpa, Cross River.
  • June 23: A land dispute led to four deaths in Suleja, Niger.

 

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