Afghan Insider Attacks: Three Things to Know
Videos

Afghan Insider Attacks: Three Things to Know

August 24, 2012 9:42 am (EST)

Afghan Insider Attacks: Three Things to Know
Explainer Video

Having just returned from Afghanistan, Linda Robinson, CFR’s adjunct senior fellow for U.S. National Security and Foreign Policy, highlights three things to know about the rise in attacks on U.S. and coalition forces in Afghanistan by members of Afghan forces:

Underlying causes: Robinson identifies two causes for the attacks: "One is insurgent infiltration of the Afghan security forces, and this can also be a conversion to the Taliban cause over time; the other cause of attacks is personal grievances that develop over time between U.S. and Afghan forces."

Countermeasures: The disparate causes require tailored responses, Robinson says. Mitigating insurgent infiltration requires counterinsurgent measures such as biometric registration of Afghan personnel, while reducing personal grievances "is a bit trickier" and may require increased cultural training and awareness on the part of U.S. and coalition forces.

Impact on the overall campaign in Afghanistan: "As to the overall impact to the campaign in Afghanistan, the seriousness of this increase in attacks can’t be overstated," says Robinson. The plans to maintain a small presence of U.S. and coalition in Afghanistan beyond 2014 in an advisory capacity may be a "nonstarter" if these forces are seen to be at risk.

Close

Top Stories on CFR

Health

This interactive examines how nationwide bans on menthol cigarettes and flavored cigars, as proposed by the Biden administration on April 28, 2022, could help shrink the racial gap on U.S. lung cancer death rates.

Japan

Sheila Smith, the John E. Merow senior fellow for Asia-Pacific studies at the Council, sits down with James M. Lindsay to discuss the reasoning behind Japan’s new defense strategy and the Japanese government’s decision to double defense spending.

United States

In addition to minority communities and those on the political left, far-right and white supremacist extremism threatens violence against institutions conservatives cherish as well, such as the U.S. military.