from Asia Unbound

The Winter Olympics and the Paradox of South Korea’s Global Reach and Its Regional Constraint

Photographers take photographs of a giant inflatable ball bearing the logo of the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympics in Incheon, South Korea, November 1, 2017. Reuters/Kim Hong-Ji

January 16, 2018

Photographers take photographs of a giant inflatable ball bearing the logo of the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympics in Incheon, South Korea, November 1, 2017. Reuters/Kim Hong-Ji
Blog Post
Blog posts represent the views of CFR fellows and staff and not those of CFR, which takes no institutional positions.

More on:

South Korea

North Korea

Olympics

United States

Diplomacy and International Institutions

The war of words between Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un in recent months has virtually drowned out the voice of South Korea, which has an existential stake in the avoidance of full-blown conflict on the Korean peninsula. But the opening inter-Korean peace talks in advance of South Korea’s hosting of the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang next month have provided South Korean President Moon Jae In with a rare opportunity. To take full advantage, Moon must overcome his country’s geographically and geopolitically precarious position in between not only the United States and North Korea, but also constrained by regional rivalries between China on the one hand, and Japan and the United States on the other.

Read more on The Hill.

More on:

South Korea

North Korea

Olympics

United States

Diplomacy and International Institutions

Creative Commons
Creative Commons: Some rights reserved.
Close
This work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) License.
View License Detail
Close