Defense and Security

Transnational Crime

Transnational Crime
  • Defense and Security

    A global naval coalition has failed to halt Somali-based piracy. More effective would be a broader approach to maritime policing that integrates African authorities, writes CFR’s Michael L. Baker.
  • Economics

    Open any Mexican newspaper today and the drug carnage is front and center. In the last three years, narco-related murders surpassed 18,000, nearly 8,000 of these occurred in 2009 alone. Yet crime-related violence in Mexico is not new. What has changed in recent decades is the scale of Mexico’s narcotics operations.
  • Defense and Security

    Three weeks ago, Reynosa, Mexico--just across the Rio Grande from McAllen, Texas--exploded in violence. The Zetas and the Gulf cartels, once allies, began what may become a fight to the death. But what happened some eight hundred miles to the west on Saturday in Ciudad Juarez, when three U.S. consulate workers--two of them U.S. citizens--were killed in their cars in broad daylight wasn’t likely masterminded by drug cartel leaders.
  • Defense and Security

    Philip Caputo paints a grim picture of Mexico’s current war on drugs in “The Fall of Mexico,” which appears in the December 2009 issue of The Atlantic. His pessimism reflects more than just skyrocketing murders in places such as Ciudad Juarez, or the seeming inability of the local police forces and courts to get to the bottom of these crimes. His chief concern revolves around Mexico’s military. However corrupt the military is today, there is a fundamental difference from the earlier parallels he poses, and these differences matter for Mexico’s future.
  • Global

    Session One:Organized Crime and Transnational ThreatsDavid Holiday, Program Officer, Latin America Program, Open Society InstituteWilliam F. Wechsler, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Counternarcotics and Global Threats, U.S. Department of DefenseLee S. Wolosky, Partner, Boies, Schiller & Flexner LLP; former Director, Transnational Threats, National Security CouncilIntroductory Remarks: Richard N. Haass, President, Council on Foreign RelationsPresider: Stanley S. Arkin, Chairman, The Arkin Group, LLC8:00 to 8:30 AM Breakfast Reception8:30 to 10:00 AM Meeting Session Two: Local and National Policy ResponsesRamon Garza Barrios, Mayor, Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas, MexicoRodrigo Pardo, Director, Revista Cambio; former Foreign Minister, Republic of ColombiaPresider: Andrew D. Selee, Director, Mexico Institute, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars10:15 to 11:30 AM Meeting Session Three:Regional and Multilateral Policy ResponsesAdam Isacson, Director of Programs, Center for International PolicyFrancisco Thoumi, Tinker Visiting Professor of Latin American Studies, University of Texas; former Research Coordinator, United Nations Office of Drugs and CrimePresider: Shannon O’Neil, Douglas Dillon Fellow for Latin America Studies, Council on Foreign Relations11:45 AM to 1:00 PM Meeting12:45 to 1:30 PM Lunch Reception
  • Global

    Watch experts analyze the greater roles regional and multilateral organizations, such as the Organization of American States and the United Nations, can play in controlling organized crime. This session was part of the CFR symposium, Organized Crime in the Western Hemisphere: An Overlooked Threat?, undertaken in collaboration with the Latin American Program and Mexico Institute of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and made possible by the generous support of the Hauser Foundation, Tinker Foundation, and a grant from the Robina Foundation for CFR's International Institutions and Global Governance program.