Meeting

Virtual Roundtable: Major Power Rivalry in East Asia

Thursday, April 29, 2021
Thomas Peter/Reuters
Speakers
Qingguo Jia

Professor and Former Dean, School of International Studies, Peking University

Evan S. Medeiros

Penner Family Chair in Asian Studies and Cling Family Distinguished Fellow in U.S.-China Studies, Georgetown University

Presider

Senior Fellow for Japan Studies, Council on Foreign Relations

The risks of conflict between the United States and China are real and growing. This situation has left the U.S.-China relationship in a precarious place that will require delicate diplomacy in order to manage intensifying competition while preventing conflict. Panelists discuss “Major Power Rivalry in East Asia,” a paper by Evan S. Medeiros in the Managing Global Disorder discussion paper series, on how U.S. and Chinese policymakers should revitalize existing tools and build new ones to manage an increasingly militarized competition.

Additional Resources

For further reading, please see CPA's Managing Global Disorder series.

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