Center for Preventive Action

Managing Global Disorder

Managing Global Disorder

Project Expert

Paul B. Stares
Paul B. Stares

General John W. Vessey Senior Fellow for Conflict Prevention and Director of the Center for Preventive Action

About the Project

Increasing geopolitical friction between the United States and other major powers—including China, the European Union, India, and Russia—not only increases the risk of major war but also lessens the likelihood that other sources of instability and conflict can be effectively managed. The Center for Preventive Action convenes international workshops and publishes discussion papers on how the United States can best manage the growing risk of a more disorderly world.

This project is made possible by the generous support of Carnegie Corporation of New York.

Publications

Global Governance

Although the world seems destined to grow more competitive, congested, and contested in the coming years, the logic of major power cooperation remains inescapable. Any effort to shape a new international order that is stable, inclusive, and beneficial to all must be a collaborative undertaking.

European Union

Middle East and North Africa

Although deep disconnects plague current transatlantic cooperation in the Middle East, the United States and Europe still share a common interest in stabilizing this volatile region.

Sub-Saharan Africa

Despite a rift in the relationship, the United States could work with Europe to help African states achieve their peace and security goals. 

China

Russia

Relations between the United States and Russia have recently declined, but U.S., European, and Russian experts identify possible areas of cooperation for the two to work together to foster global stability. 

Events

India

In this video of the Council on Foreign Relations’ Center for Preventive Action Roundtable Series on Managing Global Disorder, Qingguo Jia, Peking University, and Dhruva Jaishankar, Observer Research Foundation, discuss what the post-pandemic world may look like.

Europe and Eurasia

The COVID-19 pandemic has already sparked considerable debate over how the present international order could change as a consequence. Some commentators see the world growing more fragmented and disorderly while others believe this moment will give new impetus to international cooperation on a variety of global challenges. Speakers Andrey Kortunov, Russian International Affairs Council, and Nathalie Tocci, Istituto di Affari Internazionali, discuss what the post-pandemic world may look like. For further reading, please see the CFR discussion paper, "Perspectives on a Changing World Order," by Dhruva Jaishankar, Qingguo Jia, Andrey Kortunov, Paul Stares, and Nathalie Tocci.

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