CFR Welcomes Two New Fellows on Climate Change and Europe

September 5, 2019

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September 5, 2019—The Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) welcomes two new fellows to the David Rockefeller Studies ProgramAlice C. Hill and Matthias Matthijs.

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Alice C. Hill joins as senior fellow for climate change policy, based in Washington, DC. At CFR, Hill is researching and directing a roundtable series on preventing and mitigating the consequences of climate change.

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Most recently, Hill was a research fellow at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution, where she examined the risks, consequences, and responses associated with catastrophic global events.

Between 2013 and 2016, Hill held several positions on the staff of the National Security Council, including special assistant to the president and senior director for resilience policy. In that role she managed a team of National Security Council directors and developed policies regarding national preparedness for all hazards of global consequence, including climate change. Her book, Building a Resilient Tomorrow: How to Prepare for the Coming Climate Disruption, coauthored with Leonardo Martinez-Diazwill be published in October by Oxford University Press.

From 2009 to 2013, Hill was senior counselor to the secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, where she advised the agency’s senior leadership. She also founded and led the internationally recognized anti–human trafficking initiative, Blue Campaign.

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Previously, she was an assistant U.S. attorney in California’s central district, where she became chief of the Major Frauds Unit. In 2000, she was named a judge on the Los Angeles Superior Court, where she was a supervising judge of the North Valley district.

Hill has a bachelor’s degree in history and economics from Stanford University and a law degree from the University of Virginia School of Law.

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Matthias Matthijs joins as senior fellow for Europe, based in Washington, DC. At CFR, he is researching the future of European integration after Brexit and directing a roundtable series on European populism and political economy.

Matthijs continues as an assistant professor of international political economy at the School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) at Johns Hopkins University and is also currently serving as Chair of the Executive Committee of the European Union Studies Association. He is the recipient of a 2015 Johns Hopkins Catalyst Award, given to promising early-career researchers, which has resulted in a series of academic publications on the tensions between national democracy and European integration. At SAIS, he was also awarded the Max M. Fisher Prize for Excellence in Teaching in 2011 and 2015. Matthijs is coeditor with Mark Blyth of The Future of the Euro, published by Oxford University Press in 2015, and author of Ideas and Economic Crises in Britain from Attlee to Blair, published by Routledge in 2011. He is also a frequent contributor to Foreign Affairs.

Matthijs previously taught at American University’s School of International Service from 2008 to 2012, and was a visiting professor at SAIS Europe in Bologna during the spring of 2010. He served as a consultant for the World Bank’s Foreign Investment Advisory Service from 2005 to 2007. He has a bachelor’s degree in applied economics from the University of Antwerp, and has both a master’s degree and a doctorate in international relations from SAIS.

To request an interview with a CFR expert, please contact the Global Communications and Media Relations team at 212.434.9888 or communications@cfr.org.

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