Geoeconomic Center Hires Expert on Capital Flows and Emerging Markets

June 11, 2008

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Brad W. Setser has joined the Council as a fellow in the Maurice R. Greenberg Center for Geoeconomic Studies, focusing on the foreign policy consequences of capital surpluses in East Asia and oil-exporting states and expanding the center’s Web presence. Setser most recently was a senior economist for RGE Monitor, an online financial and economic informational company. In 2003, he was an international affairs fellow at the Council, where he wrote, with Nouriel Roubini, Bailouts or Bail-ins? Responding to Financial Crises in Emerging Economies, a book examining International Monetary Fund (IMF) policy toward crises in emerging market economies. Setser has also been a research associate at the Global Economic Governance Programme at University College, Oxford, and a visiting scholar at the IMF. He served in the U.S. Treasury Department from 1997 to 2001, where he worked extensively on reform of the international financial architecture, sovereign debt restructurings, and U.S. policy toward the IMF. He ended his time at the Treasury as the acting director of its office of international monetary and financial policy. Setser is a Council term member. He earned a BA from Harvard University, a DEA from Institut d’Études Politiques de Paris, and MPhil and DPhil degrees from Oxford University.

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