Asia Program

India's Role in the World

Project Expert

Alyssa Ayres
Alyssa Ayres

Adjunct Senior Fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia

About the Project

India's rise to power has led to speculation and expectations about how it will change the global order. On the one hand, India is huge, with more than 1.3 billion people, and on track to become the world's third-largest economy. Yet India still struggles with poverty and other challenges of a developing economy. India is also the largest and most diverse democracy, but hesitates to promote these values abroad. As the United States welcomes and supports India's rise, Americans should better understand Indians' ambitions for themselves and for their role in the Indo-Pacific and on the world stage—ambitions that are still debated within India. In my bookblog posts, and articles, I focus on the live debates in Indian foreign and economic policy shaping India's future course. I also convene the U.S. Relations with South Asia Roundtable Series to address the challenges and opportunities facing the U.S.-India relationship.

Events

India

Alyssa Ayres discusses her new book, Our Time Has Come: How India is Making Its Place in the World. 

India

Experts discuss U.S.-India relations and a new CFR independent task force report.

India

Experts discuss U.S.-India relations and a new CFR independent task force report.

Asia

Experts discuss the foreign policy priorities of recently elected leaders in Asia.

India

Experts discuss U.S.-India relations, and the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead.
  • India

    India has become an important trading partner for the United States over the past two decades, but the relationship has been marred by long-standing disagreements on everything from dairy products to intellectual property rights protections.
  • India

    A rising India wants a seat at the table of global powers, and is ready to set its own terms on everything from defense to climate to trade. Ayres considers how a fiercely independent India seeks its place as a leading power, and how the United States should respond.

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