U.S.-Cuban Relations in the 21st Century

A Follow-On Chairman’s Report

Task Force Report
Analysis and policy prescriptions of major foreign policy issues facing the United States, developed through private deliberations among a diverse and distinguished group of experts.

More on:

Cuba

Americas

Diplomacy and International Institutions

This Independent Task Force report represents a significant step forward in deepening a bipartisan consensus for a new U.S. policy toward Cuba. While avoiding the highly politicized debate over whether to lift the U.S. embargo on Cuba, the report touches on the terms for American investment in Cuba in its recommendation for the settlement of Cuban expropriation claims. The report seeks to stimulate a discussion among those interested in crafting a creative and dynamic policy toward Cuba.

 Building on an earlier Council report, Task Force Report U.S.-Cuban Relations in the 21st Century (1999), this report offers four areas of recommendations: family reunification and migration; the free flow of ideas to speed the dynamic currently under way; security proposals to develop relationships and deepen counter-narcotics cooperation, and military-to-military exchanges; and trade, investment, property, and labor rights.

More on:

Cuba

Americas

Diplomacy and International Institutions

Task Force Members

BERNARD W. ARONSON served as assistant secretary of state for inter-American affairs from 1989-93.

WILLIAM D. RODGERS was formerly assistant secretary of state for inter-American affairs and undersecretary of state for international economic affairs.

WALTER RUSSELL MEAD is the Henry A. Kissinger senior fellow in U.S. foreign policy at the Council on Foreign Relations.

JULIA E. SWEIG is a senior fellow in the Latin America program at the Council on Foreign Relations.

Top Stories on CFR

Genocide and Mass Atrocities

Thirty years ago, Rwanda’s government began a campaign to eradicate the country’s largest minority group. In just one hundred days in 1994, roving militias killed around eight hundred thousand people. Would-be killers were incited to violence by the radio, which encouraged extremists to take to the streets with machetes. The United Nations stood by amid the bloodshed, and many foreign governments, including the United States, declined to intervene before it was too late. What got in the way of humanitarian intervention? And as violent conflict now rages at a clip unseen since then, can the international community learn from the mistakes of its past?

Economics

The IMF and World Bank’s spring meetings will focus on the prospects for a soft landing after years of global economic turbulence. But major challenges remain, including growing climate finance needs and persistently high global debt levels.

South Korea

The center-left Democratic Party added to its legislative majority after the recent parliamentary election, which would deal a blow to President Yoon Suk Yeol’s domestic reform agenda and possibly his efforts to improve ties with Japan.