from Latin America Studies Program

The Western Hemisphere Drug Policy Commission: Charting a New Path Forward

Packs of marijuana, weapons and other scales are displayed after an operation against drug hitmen by Mexican soldiers at a ranch near the municipality of Sabinas Hidalgo, some 100 km away from Monterrey April 27, 2010. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo

December 03, 2020

Packs of marijuana, weapons and other scales are displayed after an operation against drug hitmen by Mexican soldiers at a ranch near the municipality of Sabinas Hidalgo, some 100 km away from Monterrey April 27, 2010. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo
Testimony
Testimony by CFR fellows and experts before Congress.

The increasingly complex threat of drug trafficking in the Western Hemisphere requires a more agile, adaptive long-term strategy. We need smarter international policies within an interagency effort led by the State Department. This over-all effort should focus on accomplishing a fundamental foreign policy goal: reducing the supply of dangerous drugs by helping partner governments in Latin America counter vicious transnational gangs.

This inter-agency effort must also address the challenge of money-laundering. US policymakers need to develop data-driven tools to detect and block the flow of illicit funds using new techniques, such as cryptocurrencies and complex cross-border financial transactions.

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Foreign Policy

The White House Office of National Drug Control Policy should ensure that these policies are cost effective, providing the executive branch with research-based analysis and performance evaluations that measure both the positive and negative impacts of law enforcement and foreign assistance.

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