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August 15, 2019

China
Fossil Fuel Free: A Plan to Phase Out China’s ICEVs

This is a guest post by Lucy Best and Michael Collins, research associates for Asia studies at the Council on Foreign Relations. The Innovation Center for Energy and Transportation (iCET), a leadi…

Cars drive on the road during the morning rush hour in Beijing, China, July 2, 2019.

August 7, 2019

United States
Election 2020: Kirsten Gillibrand, Democratic Presidential Candidate

It has been a while since Americans have elected successive presidents from the same state. Not since November 2, 1880 in fact.* That’s when Republican James A. Garfield of Ohio won the right to succ…

Kirsten Gillibrand

August 1, 2019

Women and Women's Rights
Women This Week: India Criminalizes Instant Divorce

Welcome to “Women Around the World: This Week,” a series that highlights noteworthy news related to women and U.S. foreign policy. This week’s post, covering July 22 to August 1, was compiled by Alex…

Muslim brides wait for the start of their mass marriage ceremony in Mumbai, India. May 11, 2014.

July 15, 2019

Women and Women's Rights
Five Questions on #MeToo in Pakistan: Nighat Dad

In 2017, an unprecedented wave of women’s activism began to sweep the globe. Powered by technology accessible to millions of women for the first time, a new, viral movement ignited the #MeToo campaig…

Nighat Dad

July 3, 2019

Nigeria
The Intelligence Response Team: Nigeria’s Solution to the Expanding Wave of Kidnappings

Nigeria is experiencing a wave of kidnappings that now affect the entire social spectrum.

Police officers outline suspected Boko Haram militants in Maiduguri, northeast Nigeria, on July 18, 2018.

June 28, 2019

Sub-Saharan Africa
Five Years After Kidnapping, Nigeria’s Chibok School Girls Fade From the International Scene

Five years since Boko Haram kidnapped 276 female students in Chibok, the kidnapping has largely disappeared from the western public's attention.

Zainabu Mala, mother of Kabu, one of the abducted girls, holds a picture of her daughter on April 12, 2019, in Chibok.

June 24, 2019

Immigration and Migration
Bringing a Gender Lens to the Immigration Debate

Adjunct Senior Fellow Catherine Powell presided over a CFR roundtable, “Bringing a Gender Lens to Immigration: Domestic Violence–Based Asylum and Family Separation” with Lee Gelernt, deputy director …

Salvadoran migrant child, Lupe, sits on a bus as she leaves the premises of the National Migration Institute (INM) after being deported from the United States, June 22, 2019.

June 18, 2019

Ethiopia
U.S. Should Acknowledge Critical Challenges for Ethiopia’s Transition

Anyone fishing for a good news story out of Africa recently has, rightly, celebrated Ethiopia, where dynamic young Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed has dramatically opened political space, departing from decades or repressive, tightly controlled government. But Ethiopia faces real and urgent challenges, and it is critical that well-wishers not ignore them. Abiy has lifted the lid off of a pressure cooker—one his predecessors held in place with sometimes brutal force—and in some cases the result has not been euphoria, but rather messy, complex eruptions of communal violence.

Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed sits at a desk in parliament and responds to questions

June 13, 2019

Boko Haram
New Audio Offers Potential Window Into ISWA Decision-Making

Abdulbasit Kassim, leading Boko Haram scholar, recently discovered a thirty-eight-minute recording of a purported Islamic State in West Africa (ISWA) communique. I translated it from the original Kanuri. It provides a particular version and explanation of ISWA's immediate history, and sheds light on why the group executed Mamman Nur, one of the Boko Haram’s founding fathers and an influential ideologue, its internal decision-making, and ISWA’s relationship with the Islamic State (IS). It is not clear, however, the extent to which what is described in the audio is true to what actually happened. 

Islamic-State-Al-Baghdadi-West-Africa-ISWA