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October 22, 2019

Nigeria
Nigerian Art Continues to Make Waves

A work by the late Nigerian artist Ben Enwonwu fetched $1.4 million at a Sotheby’s auction in London on October 15. The painting, “Christine,” is a 1971 portrait of the Caribbean-origin American wife of a missionary. After her death, the portrait hung on the wall at her family’s home. Unaware of the origin of the piece, a stepson eventually reached out to Sotheby’s to see if it had any value. 

A women looks at the painting "Christine," by Ben Enwonwu.

June 26, 2018

North Korea
The Art of the Summit

President Trump prides himself on being a "dealmaker." In one of his biggest deals yet, he brokered a joint statement between the United States and North Korea. To what extent did he use his eleven-s…

U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un meet in a one-on-one bilateral session at the start of their summit at the Capella Hotel on the resort island of Sentosa, Singapore June 12, 2018.

December 7, 2018

Financial Markets
Let the Sun Shine In on the Art Business

Subjective pricing and a tradition of anonymity make it attractive to money launderers.

The Cobbler by Jean Discart at Sotheby's auction house in London on April 20.

November 7, 2019

Nigeria
The Oscars Disqualify Nigeria’s Film Submission Over Language

The Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences has disqualified from competition in the International Feature Film category the Nigerian film “Lionheart” because most of the dialogue is in English. English is the only official language of the Federal Republic of Nigeria. So, “Lion Heart” is incontestably a foreign made film in Nigeria’s only national language.

Genevieve Nnaji, a Nigerian actress, poses in a red suit at the Toronto Film Festival.

November 16, 2018

Conflict Prevention
People and Politics: Fostering the Art of Conflict Prevention

Researchers and practitioners should pay greater attention to the human beings at the center of conflict politics.

Paris Peace Forum on November 11, 2018.

October 11, 2019

Terrorism and Counterterrorism
Halle Shooting: The New Terrorism Reality

The attack in eastern Germany is another alarming example of how the terrorist threat is evolving, with more far-right perpetrators attempting to broadcast their brutality.

September 18, 2019

United States
The United States Air Force Celebrates Its 72nd Birthday Today

The United States Air Force (USAF) turns 72 years-old today. On September 18, 1947, Chief Justice Fred Vinson swore in Stuart Symington as the first secretary of the air force, officially founding a …

U.S. Air Force

April 19, 2012

Human Rights
Life, Art, and the Arab Spring

In the 1930s Benito Mussolini was sufficiently offended by the Marx Brothers’ film Duck Soup to ban it in Italy.  The film, sometimes viewed as a paean to anarchy, was--given the world scene when it …

August 27, 2019

South Africa
One More Step in Dismantling Apartheid's Legacy

On August 21, South Africa’s Equality Court ruled that gratuitous displays of the Apartheid-era flag counted as hate speech and discrimination. Confronting history head on, Judge Phineas Mojapelo wrote in his ruling that the flag represents “a vivid symbol of white supremacy and black disenfranchisement and suppression,” and flying it, “besides being racist and discriminatory, demonstrates a clear intention to be hurtful.” 

South Africa's apartheid-era flag flutters in front of three black police officers.

August 19, 2019

United States
Election 2020: Pete Buttigieg, Democratic Presidential Candidate

Fact can be more interesting than fiction. In 2000, a high school senior won the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library’s annual Profiles in Courage essay contest by extolling the virtues of the countr…

Pete Buttigieg