3,250 Results for:

March 4, 2021

Territorial Disputes
Diplomatic Dithering Over Western Sahara Bodes Ill for Other African Disputes

On December 10, 2020, then President Donald Trump tweeted that because “Morocco recognized the United States in 1777,” the U.S. should return the favor by recognizing “[Moroccan] sovereignty over the Western Sahara.”

Then-U.S. Secretary of State James Baker, clutching a baseball cap, arrives in the Western Sahara in an attempt to broker a peace between the Polisario Front and Morocco over the disputed Western Sahara.

March 5, 2021

Women and Women's Rights
Women This Week: Women Soldiers in Saudi Arabia

Welcome to “Women Around the World: This Week,” a series that highlights noteworthy news related to women and U.S. foreign policy. This week’s post covers February 22 to March 5.

Hanadi Hindi, first female pilot from Saudi Arabia, sits in the cockpit of a plane prior to takeoff in Amman, Jordan in 2003.

February 23, 2021

Coronavirus
Tanzania’s COVID Denialism Harms its Economic Future

Beyond the immediate, detrimental effects for Tanzanians’ health, President John Magufuli’s aggressive COVID denialism is likely to dent the country’s economic prospects.

Two women in Tanzania are seen wearing gloves, masks, and facial shields to protect against COVID-19. Both are also wearing colorful, patterned clothing.

February 22, 2021

Digital Policy
The Putin Regime Will Never Tire of Imposing Internet Control: Developments in Digital Legislation in Russia

Moscow's recently introduced bills are the latest in a long history of efforts to bring the internet more tightly under its control.

Russian President Vladimir Putin chairs a meeting with government members.

February 25, 2021

Argentina
Argentina’s Latest Anti-Speech Scandal: Free Press on the Rocks?

Already the most dangerous region in the world for journalists, press freedom in Latin America is under attack. A recent case in Argentina underscores the pressures journalists face in speaking truth…

Mauricio Macri gives comment to dozens of reports surrounding him in a semicircle.

February 24, 2021

Digital Policy
Canada Has Denounced Clearview AI; It’s Time for the United States to Follow Suit

The United States, with its history of police brutality, mass incarceration, and systemic racism, should take similar if not more drastic measures.

A security officer monitors surveillance cameras with geo-fencing and crowd monitoring capabilities.

February 19, 2021

Women and Women's Rights
Women this Week: First Woman Leader of the WTO

Welcome to “Women Around the World: This Week,” a series that highlights noteworthy news related to women and U.S. foreign policy. This week’s post covers February 12 to February 19.   

Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala sits down for an interview with Reuters.

February 22, 2017

Europe and Eurasia
The Role of Government in Agriculture

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is by Evan Axelrad, a recent graduat…

A farmer harvests tobacco in Harare, Zimbabwe, January 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Philimon Bulawayo).

February 12, 2021

Transnational Crime
Nigeria's Enduring "Gold Wars"

Conflicts in northwest Nigeria over access to minerals—especially gold—are heating up. Illicit mining also causes environmental damage, thus exacerbating land and water shortages that cause further conflict.

A man standing in a small pool of water is using a plastic sheet with holes to filter gold dust.

February 8, 2021

Cybersecurity
The Right Response to SolarWinds

A strongly worded message has been sent to Moscow, but a forcible response that changes minds is elusive.

U.S. President Joe Biden delivers a foreign policy address as Vice President Kamala Harris and Secretary of State Antony Blinken listen during a visit to the State Department.