Defense and Security

Homeland Security

Homeland Security
  • Homeland Security

    Session One: Keynote SpeakerPhilip Zelikow, Graduate School Dean and Professor of History, University of Virginia; Former Executive Director, 9/11 CommissionWelcoming Remarks: Richard N. Haass, President, Council on Foreign RelationsPresider: Garrick Utley, President, SUNY Levin Institute12:30 to 1:00 PM Buffet Lunch1:00 to 2:00 PM Meeting Session Two: Assessing the Threat: Is the United States Still Vulnerable?Richard A. Falkenrath, Shelby Cullom and Kathryn W. Davis Adjunct Senior Fellow for Counterterrorism and Homeland Security, Council on Foreign Relations; Former Deputy Commissioner for Counterterrorism, New York City Police DepartmentJohn McLaughlin, Distinguished Practitioner in Residence, Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University; Former Acting Director of Central Intelligence Juan Zarate, Senior National Security Analyst, CBS News; Senior Adviser, Center for Strategic and International Studies; Former Deputy Assistant to the President and Deputy National Security Adviser for Combating TerrorismPresider: Gideon Rose, Editor and Peter G. Peterson Chair, Foreign Affairs2:15 to 3:30 PM Meeting                                            Session Three: Counterterrorism and Homeland Security: Does the United States Have the Right Strategy?Henry A. Crumpton, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Crumpton Group LLC; Former Coordinator for Counterterrorism, U.S. Department of StateJohn F. Lehman, Chairman, J.F. Lehman & Co.; Former U.S. Secretary of the NavyFrances Townsend, Senior Vice President, Worldwide Government, Legal, and Business Affairs, MacAndrews & Forbes Holdings Inc.; Former Assistant to the President for Homeland Security and CounterterrorismPresider: Thom Shanker, Pentagon and National Security Correspondent, New York Times; Coauthor, Counterstrike: The Untold Story of America's Secret Campaign Against Al Qaeda3:45 to 5:00 PM Meeting5:00 to 6:00 PM Cocktail ReceptionRelated Readings: Global Governance Monitor: Terrorism 9/11 Perspectives: Pursuing a Global Response to Terrorism Ten Lessons Since the 9/11 Attack, Expert Roundup Videos "Al Qaeda's Challenge," by William McCants, Foreign Affairs, September/October 2011 "9/11 in Retrospect," by Melvyn P. Leffeler, Foreign Affairs, September/October 2011 CFR Contingency Planning Memo, “A Pakistan-based Terrorist Attack on the U.S. Homeland” by Stephen Tankel
  • Homeland Security

    Post-9/11, the United States failed to take advantage of a moment of unprecedented global power to reshape itself and now faces an array of economic threats, says CFR President Richard N. Haass.
  • Terrorism and Counterterrorism

    This video is part of a special Council on Foreign Relations series that explores how 9/11 changed international relations and U.S. foreign policy. In this video, James M. Lindsay, Senior Vice President, Director of Studies, and Maurice R. Greenberg Chair at the Council on Foreign Relations traces the shifts in the balance of power in American politics following the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. "What we witnessed in the months after the attack was a political dynamic as old as the American republic. When the country feels imperiled, the White House gains in power and Congress loses it," says Lindsay. However, ten years after the attacks, "the era of terrorism has given way to the era of fiscal austerity," Lindsay argues, and "we now have American politics that looks more normal, that is much more focused inward, and features much more heated battles between Capitol Hill and the White House."
  • Homeland Security

    Laurie Garrett, senior fellow for global health at the Council on Foreign Relations, explores the lasting impact of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, and the anthrax attacks that followed on disaster preparedness and health policy in the United States. Garrett argues that "all our readiness response depends on well-funded police, well-funded fire departments, well-funded hospitals, well-funded public health infrastructures, and precisely the opposite is where we are going right now." Garrett cautions that U.S. preparedness for a major terrorist attack may be decreasing. "As budgets are being cut at the federal level, the state level, and the local level, we’re actually less ready than we were in 2001," Garrett says.
  • Homeland Security

    Within days of the 9/11 attacks, Congress authorized U.S. military and intelligence agencies to kill and detain terrorists. It is time to revise that authority on matters like detentions and drone attacks, says CFR’s John B. Bellinger III.
  • Homeland Security

    Which policies have worked and which ones need work ten years after the worst terrorist attacks in U.S. history? CFR experts examine ten issues that have preoccupied U.S. planners.
  • United States

    This video is part of a special Council on Foreign Relations series that explores how 9/11 changed international relations and U.S. foreign policy. In this video, Stewart M. Patrick, senior fellow and director of the International Institutions and Global Governance Program at the Council on Foreign Relations, identifies the successes and lasting challenges in the international community’s response to global terrorism since the attacks of September 11, 2001. "The world has made a lot of progress," says Patrick, "but it still has quite a bit of a ways to go to achieve real consensus and real solidarity in this fight."
  • Homeland Security

    This video is part of a special Council on Foreign Relations series that explores how 9/11 changed international relations and U.S. foreign policy. In this video, Steven Cook, Hasib J. Sabbagh Senior Fellow for Middle Eastern Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations discusses how the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 transformed the United States’ Middle East policy. Cook argues the attacks led to the conclusion that "authoritarian stability -- that is, relying on authoritarian leaders in the region to help create a political order that made it relatively easier for the United States to pursue its interests in the region -- was perhaps no longer appropriate." Instead, U.S. policy has been devoted from that point on to "fostering democratic change in the Middle East."