Modi’s Visit to Washington DC: Resources from CFR and Foreign Affairs

Ahead of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s fourth visit to the United States and his first address to the U.S. Congress on June 8, the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) and Foreign Affairs offer resources on relevant topics.

June 7, 2016

News Releases

Ahead of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s fourth visit to the United States and his first address to the U.S. Congress on June 8, the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) and Foreign Affairs offer resources on relevant topics.

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A Timeline of U.S.-India Relations
India and the United States weathered Cold War-era distrust and estrangement over India’s nuclear program. In recent years, relations have warmed. CFR’s timeline traces the U.S-India relationship from 1948 to the present.

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India

Diplomacy and International Institutions

Narendra Modi

A Conversation with Narendra Modi
In September 2014, Prime Minister Modi joined CFR President Richard N. Haass to discuss economic growth in India and U.S.-India relations. Watch the event and read the transcript.

Working With a Rising India: A Joint Venture for the New Century
“A rising India offers one of the most substantial opportunities to advance American national interests over the next two decades,” asserts an Independent Task Force report sponsored by the Council on Foreign Relations, Working With a Rising India: A Joint Venture for the New Century

In a CFR.org interview about the promise of a U.S.-India partnership, Task Force Co-Chair and Harvard Kennedy School Professor Joseph S. Nye says, “A growing Indian economy provides benefits for the health of the world economy, as well as the United States through bilateral trade and investment.”  

Reframing the U.S.-India Bilateral Relationship
In testimony before the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations this May, CFR Senior Fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia Alyssa Ayres recommends reframing the bilateral relationship as a joint venture instead of as a not-quite alliance, arguing that such a shift would allow for increased cooperation in areas of convergence without letting differences undermine progress.

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In testimony before the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Asia and the Pacific earlier this March, Ayres recommends that the United States elevate its support for India’s economic growth and its reform process to the highest bilateral priority.

How to Build an Alliance
The U.S.-India defense relationship has entered a new phase that includes cooperation on the development of defense equipment, write CFR Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow Amy J. Nelson and Research Associate Ashlyn Anderson in a ForeignAffairs.com article. 

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India

Diplomacy and International Institutions

Narendra Modi

Why India’s Economy Is at the Head of the Pack
“Not long ago, India was the laggard among the big emerging economies,” observes CFR’s Paul A. Volcker Senior Fellow for International Economics Sebastian Mallaby in an Expert Brief, but, “In 2015 its economy grew by 7.2 percent, faster than any other major nation.” 

India Warms Up to Climate Action
India took a major step shortly before global climate talks in Paris, but the country’s clean energy strategy still faces domestic and international challenges, writes CFR’s Douglas Dillon Fellow Varun Sivaram and Annushka Shivani in an Expert Brief.  

Preventing Armed Confrontation Between China and India
A border clash, conflict with Pakistan, maritime skirmish, or crisis over Tibet could raise tensions between China and India to the point of armed confrontation. In a Contingency Planning Memorandum, CFR Adjunct Senior Fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia Daniel S. Markey explains how the United States can promote peaceful relations between the world’s two largest countries.

The New Geopolitics of China, India, and Pakistan
The simultaneous developments including the rise of China and India is forcing the United States to recalibrate its own grand strategy in South Asia and the Indian Ocean. The Council on Foreign Relations’ Asia program recently hosted a symposium to discuss the new geopolitics of South Asia and released the discussion’s highlights in a workshop report

Competition in the Indian Ocean
The Indian Ocean is the world’s third largest body of water and is increasingly an area of competition between China and India. This CFR Backgrounder examines how the two regional powers’ moves to exert influence in the ocean through port development and military exercises could endanger stability in the region. 

What to Do About U.S.-India Relations
Following President Obama’s visit to India in January 2015, Alyssa Ayres, CFR’s senior fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia, Robert D. Blackwill, CFR’s Henry A. Kissinger Senior Fellow for U.S. Foreign Policy, and Stephen P. Cohen, senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, joined John D. Negroponte, vice chairman at McLarty Associates, to assess the opportunities and challenges of the U.S.-India bilateral relationship. Watch the event or read the transcript.

CFR Experts and Additional Resources on India and South Asia
Alyssa Ayres, Senior Fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia, @AyresAlyssa

Robert D. Blackwill, Henry A. Kissinger Senior Fellow for U.S. Foreign Policy; Former U.S. Ambassador to India

Daniel S. Markey, Adjunct Senior Fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia, @MarkeyDaniel

Follow CFR’s Asia program on Twitter @CFR_Asia and at the Asia Unbound blog.   

 

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