U.S. Influence Over Cyberspace Is Eroding, Warns Adam Segal in New CFR Book, The Hacked World Order

“While it should continue to promote and espouse the virtues of an open, global, and secure Internet, the United States must prepare for a more likely future—a highly contested, nationally divided cyberspace,” writes Adam Segal, director of the digital and cyberspace policy program at the Council on Foreign Relations, in his new book, The Hacked World Order: How Nations Fight, Trade, Maneuver, and Manipulate in the Digital Age.

February 5, 2016

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February 3, 2016—International conflicts in cyberspace have increased since 2012, with countries now openly using the web to attack, steal from, and spy on each other. Given how embedded the Internet has become in people’s lives, these disputes could have devastating consequences.

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“While it should continue to promote and espouse the virtues of an open, global, and secure Internet, the United States must prepare for a more likely future—a highly contested, nationally divided cyberspace,” writes Adam Segal, director of the digital and cyberspace policy program at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR), in his new book, The Hacked World Order: How Nations Fight, Trade, Maneuver, and Manipulate in the Digital Age.

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“The challenges of the hacked world order are both familiar—other states will pursue policies that limit U.S. power and influence—and unconventional—new actors may exploit unexpected and unknown vulnerabilities in networks to wreak damage and destruction,” writes Segal, who is also CFR’s Maurice R. Greenberg senior fellow for China studies.

In the book, Segal details the characteristics of a fractured cyberspace, including

To maintain American influence and enhance security in this new environment, Segal identifies three core objectives for the U.S. government:

Media Inquiries: Jake Meth, 212.434.9537, jmeth@cfr.org; Michelle Barton, 212.434.9886, mbarton@cfr.org

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