Women, Peace, and Security: Fifteen Years After the Adoption of UN Security Council Resolution 1325

Thursday, October 15, 2015
Speakers
Radhika Coomaraswamy

Lead Author of the United Nations’ Global Study on the Implementation of UN Security Council Resolution 1325

Presiders

Fellow, Women and Foreign Policy Program, Council on Foreign Relations

Fifteen years ago, the United Nations (UN) Security Council adopted Resolution 1325, acknowledging for the first time the critical role of women in peace and security matters—not only as victims of conflict, but as leaders in conflict prevention, peacemaking, and peacebuilding. What have been the successes and challenges in implementing Resolution 1325? What impact does the empowerment and participation of women and girls have on peace and security issues? What is the role of Resolution 1325 in addressing emerging threats to peace and security, including violent extremism and climate change? Please join the lead author of the United Nations’ Global Study on the Implementation of UN Security Council Resolution 1325, Radhika Coomaraswamy and CFR’s Catherine Powell to discuss the progress, impact, and future of Resolution 1325.

In addition to being the lead author of the global study on Resolution 1325, Ms. Coomaraswamy has also served as the special rapporteur on violence against women (1994–2003) and as the special representative of the secretary-general for children and armed conflict (2006–2013). A lawyer by training, she is a strong advocate for women’s rights, and an internationally known human rights defender.  Beginning this fall, she will serve as a representative on the Sri Lanka Constitutional Council.

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