Coronavirus

The worldwide spread of the new coronavirus has pulled back the curtain on the vulnerabilities of our interconnected world. Now we are left asking some basic questions. What lessons have we learned so far?

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Host
  • Gabrielle Sierra
    Director, Podcasting
Credits

Asher Ross - Supervising Producer

Markus Zakaria - Audio Producer and Sound Designer

Rafaela Siewert - Associate Podcast Producer

Episode Guests
  • Sylvia Mathews Burwell
    President, American University
  • Rana Foroohar
    Global Business Columnist and Associate Editor, Financial Times
  • Tom Frieden
    Senior Fellow for Global Health
  • Shannon K. O'Neil
    Vice President, Deputy Director of Studies, and Nelson and David Rockefeller Senior Fellow for Latin America Studies

Show Notes

The coronavirus has us asking a lot of questions. Who gets to make the decisions that matter about public health? How can we protect ourselves in an interconnected world? Why are there market crashes, and what’s happening with global supply chains? Presented in two parts, this episode takes a look at the organizations that tackle public health emergencies, and the effects the coronavirus is having on our globalized economy. 

 

From CFR

 

What You Need to Know About the Coronavirus Outbreak,” Claire Felter and Lindsay Maizland

 

The World Health Organization,” CFR.org Editors

 

The Coronavirus, Oil, and Global Supply Chains,” Amy M. Jaffe

 

The Coronavirus Outbreak Could Disrupt the U.S. Drug Supply,” Yanzhong Huang 

 

Read More 

 

The CDC’s guidance on the coronavirus

 

The WHO’s guidance on the coronavirus

 

Coronavirus and 2020 Elections: What Happens to Voting in an Outbreak,” New York Times

 

When Everyone Stays Home: Empty Public Spaces During Coronavirus,” Atlantic

 

Corporate margins are going to be squeezed,” Financial Times

 

Watch or Listen

 

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction,” CNN

 

Will Coronavirus Cause a Recession?,” The Journal

 

Why new diseases keep appearing in China,” Vox

Genocide and Mass Atrocities

Thirty years ago, Rwanda’s government began a campaign to eradicate the country’s largest minority group. In just one hundred days in 1994, roving militias killed around eight hundred thousand people. Would-be killers were incited to violence by the radio, which encouraged extremists to take to the streets with machetes. The United Nations stood by amid the bloodshed, and many foreign governments, including the United States, declined to intervene before it was too late. What got in the way of humanitarian intervention? And as violent conflict now rages at a clip unseen since then, can the international community learn from the mistakes of its past?

Economics

Many Americans are losing faith in the benefits of internationalism. But whether it’s wars in the Gaza Strip and Ukraine, worsening extreme weather as a result of climate change, or the trade-offs of globalization, events abroad are increasingly having a local impact. At the same time, more state and local officials in the United States are becoming involved in global affairs, conducting their own form of diplomacy on international issues and driving investment home. What role should the United States play in the world economy? And how do states and cities fit in?

Space

Unidentified flying objects (UFOs) are real. And the truth about them is often hidden from the public, for reasons related to national security. That secrecy has fed conspiracy theories about the possibility of alien life on Earth, creating a stigma around the legitimate scientific search for life on other planets. Why are UFOs considered a defense concern? And does a defense framing of UFOs inhibit scientific research?

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