Season Two Trailer

Is China exporting its authoritarian model to other countries? Is the “fast fashion” industry accelerating climate change? In season two, Why It Matters explores a new series of issues that are flying under the radar now, but won’t be for long.

March 25, 2020 — 1:59 min
Play Button Pause Button
00:00

Host

Gabrielle Sierra

Podcast Host and Producer Full Bio
Close

Transcript

The world is a big place. And now more than ever it’s clear that global problems can become local--in a flash. In our last season, we covered 11 issues that could change our lives. Like the possibility of robots going to war--

Paul SCHARRE: Even if machines could make all the right decisions, machines aren't going to feel the moral impact of those decisions.

And the risks of trying to cool our planet by dimming the sky. 

Shuchi TALATI: I think whatever decision we make we have to do it with future generations in mind. 

And how a pandemic can expose the cracks in our interconnected world.

Tom FRIEDEN: A weakness anywhere is a weakness everywhere. We can’t protect ourselves from diseases by pulling up the drawbridge around the United States.

Now, in our second season, we're diving into new issues that may be flying under the radar but won’t be for long. 

Elizabeth SEGRAN: I think it’s worth realizing that the fashion industry is hugely polluting and we are directly responsible for this impact.

Chinmayi ARUN: Is the problem that they are reading this on the internet? Or is the problem that it is being confirmed by the media?

SIERRA: What do you see as the responsibility of a private company that has so much influence in another country? 

Seema MODY: So, this is a really interesting question. 

Vindu GOEL: If Whatsapp had a traceability, India would not be the only country to ask, other countries would ask. 

Elizabeth ECONOMY: Fundamentally what I think Xi Jinping is attempting to do is simply to make the world safe for authoritarianism. 

Dayo AIYETAN: That is the kind of thing we want to prevent in Nigeria.

Elizabeth SEGRAN: In that 15-year-period, the number of clothes manufactured globally doubled. 

Amber VALLETTA: Cut off those pants and make them into shorts? I don’t know. 

Linda GREER: Ah, this is the point in which the podcast needs to be video so I could be wringing my hands for people to see. 

So join us as we bring some of the world’s interesting stories home to you. From the Council on Foreign Relations, this is Why it Matters.


 

More Episodes

There is no country quite like Russia. Despite having a relatively small economy, it has been able to maintain global influence through a range of unconventional tac...

There is no country quite like Russia. Despite having a relatively small economy, it has been able to maintain global influence through a range of unconventional tac...

Read More

What does it take to make a Hollywood blockbuster? Movie stars? A great script? How about approval from the Chinese government? In this episode, two guests explore t...

What does it take to make a Hollywood blockbuster? Movie stars? A great script? How about approval from the Chinese government? In this episode, two guests explore t...

Read More

Projections show that by 2050, Africa’s population will double. By 2100, one in three people on Earth will be African. This means that, by the end of the century, su...

Projections show that by 2050, Africa’s population will double. By 2100, one in three people on Earth will be African. This means that, by the end of the century, su...

Read More

The Brazilian Amazon is burning, threatening the world’s largest repository of biodiversity. If the fires are not controlled soon, they could release a “climate bomb...

The Brazilian Amazon is burning, threatening the world’s largest repository of biodiversity. If the fires are not controlled soon, they could release a “climate bomb...

Read More

Fifty-five percent of the global population lacks access to safe sanitation, a deadly global health disparity that rarely finds its way into the spotlight. In this e...

Fifty-five percent of the global population lacks access to safe sanitation, a deadly global health disparity that rarely finds its way into the spotlight. In this e...

Read More

The United States trails far behind most advanced democracies when it comes to voter turnout, with just 55 percent of eligible voters participating in the 2016 elect...

The United States trails far behind most advanced democracies when it comes to voter turnout, with just 55 percent of eligible voters participating in the 2016 elect...

Read More

What happens when the world runs out of fish? Does TikTok actually present a national security risk? Will Africa's population boom change the world as we know it? In...

What happens when the world runs out of fish? Does TikTok actually present a national security risk? Will Africa's population boom change the world as we know it? In...

Read More

Works of art and cultural heritage sites are common casualties in war. In many cases, the sale of plundered treasures has helped finance ongoing conflict. In this ep...

Works of art and cultural heritage sites are common casualties in war. In many cases, the sale of plundered treasures has helped finance ongoing conflict. In this ep...

Read More

For decades, international students have enjoyed bipartisan support in the United States, with strong consensus that they fuel American innovation, job creation, and...

For decades, international students have enjoyed bipartisan support in the United States, with strong consensus that they fuel American innovation, job creation, and...

Read More

As the effects of climate change move from scientific predictions to daily headlines, some investors have begun sounding the alarm about impending dangers to financi...

As the effects of climate change move from scientific predictions to daily headlines, some investors have begun sounding the alarm about impending dangers to financi...

Read More