New Year’s Special: 2020 Hindsight

At the start of the new year, the Why It Matters team takes a look at some of the best interview segments that didn’t make it into the episodes. 

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Host
  • Gabrielle Sierra
    Director, Podcasting
Credits

Asher Ross - Supervising Producer

Markus Zakaria - Audio Producer and Sound Designer

Rafaela Siewert - Associate Podcast Producer

Episode Guests
  • Alexandra Bell
    Senior Policy Director, Center for Arms Control and Nonproliferation
  • Richard K. Betts
    Adjunct Senior Fellow for National Security Studies
  • Elizabeth C. Economy
    Senior Fellow for China Studies
  • Stewart M. Patrick
    James H. Binger Senior Fellow in Global Governance and Director of the International Institutions and Global Governance Program
  • Paul Scharre
    Senior Fellow and Director of the Technology and National Security Program, Center for a New American Security
  • Megan Smith
    Chief Executive Officer, Shift7
  • Abigail Stowe-Thurston
    Program Coordinator, Center for Arms Control and Nonproliferation

Show Notes

The interviews for Why It Matters last about an hour, but they are eventually cut down to five or ten minutes. As a result, a lot of great material doesn’t make it in. This episode features the most fascinating clips that were too good to leave behind. 

 

To learn more about these clips, check out the other episodes and their show notes. 

 

The Big Red Button 

China Doesn’t Want Your Trash

STEMinism

Space Jam

Genocide and Mass Atrocities

Thirty years ago, Rwanda’s government began a campaign to eradicate the country’s largest minority group. In just one hundred days in 1994, roving militias killed around eight hundred thousand people. Would-be killers were incited to violence by the radio, which encouraged extremists to take to the streets with machetes. The United Nations stood by amid the bloodshed, and many foreign governments, including the United States, declined to intervene before it was too late. What got in the way of humanitarian intervention? And as violent conflict now rages at a clip unseen since then, can the international community learn from the mistakes of its past?

Economics

Many Americans are losing faith in the benefits of internationalism. But whether it’s wars in the Gaza Strip and Ukraine, worsening extreme weather as a result of climate change, or the trade-offs of globalization, events abroad are increasingly having a local impact. At the same time, more state and local officials in the United States are becoming involved in global affairs, conducting their own form of diplomacy on international issues and driving investment home. What role should the United States play in the world economy? And how do states and cities fit in?

Space

Unidentified flying objects (UFOs) are real. And the truth about them is often hidden from the public, for reasons related to national security. That secrecy has fed conspiracy theories about the possibility of alien life on Earth, creating a stigma around the legitimate scientific search for life on other planets. Why are UFOs considered a defense concern? And does a defense framing of UFOs inhibit scientific research?

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